All photos from day 5
[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]
[IMAGE]

10:30pm, Friday August 17, 2001, Coco Bay, Georgian Bay

Many people had a rough night last night. Happily for me, the MEC Wanderer 2 Safe Haven saved my down sleeping bag covered butt. It rained last night from about 9pm to about 4am. Serious rain. I woke up a few times during the night and noticed some dampness at the wall by my feet. Occasionally I felt the tent move with the wind.

Over the other side of the hill, others had it much worse.

Florent (aka Coco) and Lisette were drenched. The wind blew the fly off their tent. The wind whipped their tent back and forth with tremendous vigor. They got no sleep.

Claudine and Margaret, perched atop a hill in the the boxy, OOC-supplied Eureka (what you say after spending an hour trying to figure out how the fuck you set it up) tent, fared just as badly. The wind (which Jim says reached 8 on the Beaufort scale) ripped off their vestibule, and left the flat-fronted tent exposed to rain and in the perfect shape to act as a sort of main sail. Despite shaking back and forth like Metallica's metronome, the tent didn't collapse. Minor miracle I say.

Jill and Terry's Eureka was sheltered from the wind but took water. They slept though.

Jim slept but his tent took water.

We were all moving a little slowly but everyone was remarkably cheerful. The morning stayed overcast, but the rain held off, allowing people to wind dry their belongings. Some of us went hiking to see if we could get a look at the big nasty bay.

Jim declared, demonstrating once again an uncanny ability to read minds, that we were staying put today. A lot of us caught up on sleep that day. We sat around under the tarp, tellng jokes and stories, and trying to stave off boredom. Claudine and Margaret, Lisette and Coco relocated their tents. Everyone did "maintenance". I made use of a few more of those anchor points on my tent. At about 4pm, it started to clear. Some of us went paddling. Jim fished, or rather flayed the air with a bit of yellow string attatched to a thin fibreglass pole. If he actually had been fishing, I'm sure he would have caught something.

In the evening we had a camp fire, during which the clouds reclaimed the sky and began to tease us with a gentle spitting.

Tomorrow begins the first of two days' travel back to Key Inlet. It's still looking like bad weather. Hope we're pleasantly surprised.

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